Perspectives

How Smartphone Technology Is Changing Healthcare In Developing Countries

Jonathan Mayes1, Andrew White1 1 Newcastle University Correspondence to: Jonathan Mayes, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The Medical School, Newcastle University, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, United Kingdom. Tel: 0191 208 7005 Email: [email protected] It is widely recognized that technology can improve the health of populations in countries around the world. Smartphone technology is

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A Doctoral Student Complementarity Approach (DSCA) for Global Health Research

Shaun R. Cleaver1, Nadia Fazal1 1University of Toronto A large and growing number of doctoral students are involved with global health research. Here we outline the Doctoral Student Complementary Approach (DSCA), a strategy to connect doctoral students from high-income countries (HICs) with counterparts from low-income countries (LMICs) in order to incur benefits for both students

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Mental Health in Haiti: Beyond Disaster Relief

Olivia Tiberi School of Medicine, Imperial College London Haiti, one of the poorest countries in the world, was devastated by an earthquake in 2010. The disaster uncovered the realities of a non-existent mental health care system with only ten psychiatrists nationwide. Attempts were made to assess the increased prevalence of mental illness, likely due to the trauma

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From Words to Actions: Comparing the Disparities Between National Drug Policy and Local Implementation in Tijuana, Mexico and Vancouver, Canada

Smith DM1,2; Werb D1,3; and Strathdee SA1 1Division of Global Public Health, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, USA 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; 3International Centre for Science in Drug Policy, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Canada In 2009, Mexico passed a national drug policy reform decriminalizing the

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Impacts of Deforestation on Vector-borne Disease Incidence

Allison Gottwalt Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA Forest clearance alters ecosystem dynamics and leads to new breeding habitats for disease vectors, such as mosquitoes, fleas and ticks, by reshaping existing ecosystem boundaries. Such boundaries are often sites of contact between humans and forest pathogens. There is a well-documented, positive

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Detecting Intimate Partner Violence and Postpartum Depression

Jean Marie Place, MSW, MPH Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior; Women and Gender Studies, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA Postpartum depression (PPD) is a pressing public health concern because of the negative effects on women’s psychological well-being and infant-mother attachment, yet few health providers screen for

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Barriers to the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis in Sub-Saharan Africa

Michael Celone This paper examines barriers to the elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) in Sub-Saharan Africa. Caused predominantly by the filarial worm Wuchereria bancrofti, LF infects 120 million people worldwide, with about 40 million people showing symptoms like hydrocele, lymphedema, or elephantiasis. In 2000, the World Health Organization established the Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic

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Sex Work and the Law in South Africa, Sweden and New Zealand: an evidence based argument for decriminalization

Meghan Hynes, MPH Sex workers face a myriad of intersecting health and safety concerns including HIV transmission, access to health and social services, violence via clients, police harassment, social stigma and economic insecurity. A growing demand for the universal decriminalization of sex work has garnered significant media attention and has brought about heavy public scrutiny. The countries of South

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Prevalence and associated risk factors of Intestinal Helminths infections among pre- school children (1 to 5 years old) in IDPs settlements of Khartoum state, Sudan

  Abstract Objective: To assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of Intestinal Helminth infections among pre-school children (1 to 5 years old) in Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) settlements. Methods: A multistage cluster sampling, cross-sectional study was conducted in IDPs Settlements of Khartoum State, Sudan, in 2013. Questionnaires were collected from 662 preschool children and

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