Perspectives

The Impact of Maternal Services on the Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission (PMTCT): A Literature Review

Cynthia Mouafo Piaplié M.A Candidate, International Affairs The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada This paper provides a review of the available literature regarding prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) in sub-Saharan Africa. To narrow the focus of this broad subject, the review concentrates on antenatal care (ANC) and its

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Are Cash Transfer Programs Effective in Improving Maternal and Child Health in Sub-Saharan Africa? A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

Christiana Chinyere Ekezie, Kathleen Lamont, Sohinee Bhattacharya Objective: Conduct a systematic review to assess the impact of poverty elimination on maternal and child health through cash transfer programs in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We searched Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Pubmed, Scopus and African Journals for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing cash transfer interventions for

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Enhancing Cancer Control in Kenya Through Knowledge Translation: A Perspective Review

Joshua Munywoki1 and Helen Dimaras1,2,3,4,5,6 1Department of Human Pathology, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya 2Department of Ophthalmology & Vision Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto Canada 3Division of Clinical Public Health, Dalla Lana School of Public Health and the 4Department of Ophthalmology & Vision Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada 5Child

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Potential Role for Institutional Review Boards in Curbing Medical Voluntourism in Global Health at American Academic Centers

Timothy S. Laux, MD1 1University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA – Global Health Fellow at the HEAL Initiative Across disciplines, consensus exists that medical voluntourism (as practiced by US-based health care professionals and professionals-in-training) is of questionable benefit to overseas health care practitioners and systems. This concern stands in sharp distinction to

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How Smartphone Technology Is Changing Healthcare In Developing Countries

Jonathan Mayes1, Andrew White1 1 Newcastle University Correspondence to: Jonathan Mayes, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The Medical School, Newcastle University, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, United Kingdom. Tel: 0191 208 7005 Email: [email protected] It is widely recognized that technology can improve the health of populations in countries around the world. Smartphone technology is

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A Scoping Literature Review of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among South Asian Immigrant Women in Canada

Iffath U.B. Syed HBSc, MPH, PhD Candidate1, Farah Ahmad, MBBS, MPH, PhD2 1York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Health, Nursing & Environmental Studies, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Global migration has recently garnered intense interest from a public health standpoint. Topics concerning migration, such as push-pull theories, resettlement stress, the healthy immigrant effect, cultural assimilation, and

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A Doctoral Student Complementarity Approach (DSCA) for Global Health Research

Shaun R. Cleaver1, Nadia Fazal1 1University of Toronto A large and growing number of doctoral students are involved with global health research. Here we outline the Doctoral Student Complementary Approach (DSCA), a strategy to connect doctoral students from high-income countries (HICs) with counterparts from low-income countries (LMICs) in order to incur benefits for both students

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Mental Health in Haiti: Beyond Disaster Relief

Olivia Tiberi School of Medicine, Imperial College London Haiti, one of the poorest countries in the world, was devastated by an earthquake in 2010. The disaster uncovered the realities of a non-existent mental health care system with only ten psychiatrists nationwide. Attempts were made to assess the increased prevalence of mental illness, likely due to the trauma

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From Words to Actions: Comparing the Disparities Between National Drug Policy and Local Implementation in Tijuana, Mexico and Vancouver, Canada

Smith DM1,2; Werb D1,3; and Strathdee SA1 1Division of Global Public Health, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, USA 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; 3International Centre for Science in Drug Policy, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Canada In 2009, Mexico passed a national drug policy reform decriminalizing the

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Impacts of Deforestation on Vector-borne Disease Incidence

Allison Gottwalt Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA Forest clearance alters ecosystem dynamics and leads to new breeding habitats for disease vectors, such as mosquitoes, fleas and ticks, by reshaping existing ecosystem boundaries. Such boundaries are often sites of contact between humans and forest pathogens. There is a well-documented, positive

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